Men might be renowned for complaining whenever there is the slightest sign that they are coming down with a cold or the flu, but there are certain health complaints that they tend to be decidedly quiet about. Here are a couple of men’s health taboos, along with some suggestions on how to break them.

1) Erectile dysfunction

One topic you aren’t likely to hear men discussing openly is erectile dysfunction (ED). All too often, sufferers of this problem consider it to be a source of shame and embarrassment, so they try to keep it to themselves and simply hope it will go away. This can be a big mistake though. ED can be caused by potentially serious underlying physical complaints, such as high cholesterol, diabetes or high blood pressure, and so it’s important for sufferers to seek medical advice in case they need treatment for these problems. Also, ED can be triggered or made worse by psychological issues like depression or anxiety. Trying to ignore it can compound these issues, leading to a vicious circle. It might help to use a fleshlight to encourage more blood flow and reduce the effects of this vicious circle. If you decide to get one, 15% off a $100 for Fleshlight.com.

If you’re planning to broach the subject of ED with your partner, try to make sure that he realises he’s not alone. The fact is, most men experience this condition at some time in their lives. While for some it’s just a one-off problem, for many others it’s a recurrent issue. Also, let your partner know that help is available. For example, it’s now possible to access prescription erectile dysfunction drugs like Viagra and Cialis. These treatments are effective for around three-quarters of ED sufferers. If he doesn’t want to approach a doctor in person to ask about these medicines, he can request a prescription online from health specialists such as Online Doctor Lloyds Pharmacy.

2) Depression

Depression is also often seen as a taboo health issue. Men tend to think that admitting they are suffering from this problem is a sign of weakness, or that by doing so they will let down their families. Also, people can make the mistake of thinking that they should simply be able to pull themselves together and start thinking more positively. In fact, depression is a real illness and it is not something that people can just snap out of.

If you suspect your partner or a male relative or friend has depression but isn’t admitting it to themselves or to others, try to encourage them to open up about their feelings. It’s best to ask non-confrontational questions and to listen rather than try to offer answers. Make sure the person knows that help is available too. Treatments can include medicines or talking therapies, or a combination of the two.

Men may always be reluctant to talk about health issues such as ED and depression. However, by following advice like this, you stand a better chance of breaking these taboos and helping them to get the treatment they need.